Pastor Darrin

June 15, 2016

The city of Orlando, Florida was rocked this week by the biggest mass shooting in U.S. history. It’s sad to see such the land of the free and the brave to be invaded by the brainwashed and cowardly. The killer was a disturbed soul. Stories are circulating about his background and personal struggles, but the bottom line is that we shouldn’t kill those we disagree with.

What’s also sad is that our leading politicians made this event an argument for their platform for gun or immigration control. If we can just keep the guns out of “bad people’s” hands, or shut our borders to the “wackos”, we would avert a lot of tragedies. There is wisdom in a level of gun control and restricting our borders, but we won’t ever be fully protected from those with evil intent.

What matters most right now is that there are dozens of families that are grieving great losses. Parents who were helpless to rescue their adult children and friends who watched friends get shot. Forty-nine people were killed. More than that were wounded. A time will come to address legislation. This is the time to administer love. The Bible describes God this way:

“The Father of compassion and the God of all comfort, who comforts us in all our troubles….” (2 Corinthians 1:3-4)

This is a time to show empathy to those who suffer, regardless of their nationality, religion or moral positions. We’re to weep with those who weep (Romans 12:15).

Jesus taught us to love indiscriminately because He so loved the world. Not after it turned to Him or got things right, but in its messed up state. While we were yet sinners, God demonstrated His love in sending Jesus to die for our sins (Romans 5:8). What Jesus taught is that you don’t have to agree with someone to love them.

Let’s leave judgment up to God and legislation to the politicians. As the Body of Christ, let’s be like Jesus and weep over cities that need the care of a Shepherd. This would be a good time to turn off the TV’s, unplug from social media, and get on your knees crying out to the God of all comfort to heal the emotional and physical wounds of those who endured one of the darkest days of our generation.

Looking Upward,

Pastor Darrin

 

Pastor Darrin

April 27, 2016

In Fall of 1992, Michael Plant took off on a solo voyage from the United States to France in his yacht. He was a yachtsman with unparalleled skills. His sailboat, which he named Coyote, was state of the art. He’d installed an emergency position-indicating radio beacon that was capable of sending signals via satellite that would spot his exact location if any trouble arose. He seemed superbly prepared, but eleven days into his voyage, he disappeared without notice.

Everyone knew that Plant was an independent man, so they assumed that no news was good news. Yet the bad news was that the Coyote had gone down. Days passed before the yacht was found, and when they did find it, the craft was floating upside down with no sight of its captain. What made this so strange was the fact that sailboats don’t flip over. There is always more weight below the water line than above it which enables it to weather most storms. When the Coyote was retrieved they discovered a 4-ton ballast missing from the keel, which would have made the sailboat top-heavy and unable to handle the turbulent waters.

We often don’t take seriously what’s below the waterline, the part of our lives that isn’t seen by most people. I’m talking about the soul. The condition of your soul will cause you to either overcome or be overwhelmed by the storms of life. And we don’t usually know just how strong that weight is until the storm hits. Unfortunately, we often are so busy hoisting our sails and putting furniture on the deck and forgetting to pay attention to the weight underneath. We are more disciplined with the gym and the workout videos than we are our regular quiet times of prayer with the Lord. We evaluate what we’re going to wear that day more than we consider the attitude in which we carry that day. We delight more in our meals than in feeding our minds with truth from God’s Word.

We can get by many days without concerning ourselves with what’s below the deck. But there’s no doubt that when the storm hits, everyone will know. Someone will get hurt really bad. But you can avoid that, if you tend to your soul.

Pastor Darrin

April 27, 2016

In Fall of 1992, Michael Plant took off on a solo voyage from the United States to France in his yacht. He was a yachtsman with unparalleled skills. His sailboat, which he named Coyote, was state of the art. He’d installed an emergency position-indicating radio beacon that was capable of sending signals via satellite that would spot his exact location if any trouble arose. He seemed superbly prepared, but eleven days into his voyage, he disappeared without notice.

Everyone knew that Plant was an independent man, so they assumed that no news was good news. Yet the bad news was that the Coyote had gone down. Days passed before the yacht was found, and when they did find it, the craft was floating upside down with no sight of its captain. What made this so strange was the fact that sailboats don’t flip over. There is always more weight below the water line than above it which enables it to weather most storms. When the Coyote was retrieved they discovered a 4-ton ballast missing from the keel, which would have made the sailboat top-heavy and unable to handle the turbulent waters.

We often don’t take seriously what’s below the waterline, the part of our lives that isn’t seen by most people. I’m talking about the soul. The condition of your soul will cause you to either overcome or be overwhelmed by the storms of life. And we don’t usually know just how strong that weight is until the storm hits. Unfortunately, we often are so busy hoisting our sails and putting furniture on the deck and forgetting to pay attention to the weight underneath. We are more disciplined with the gym and the workout videos than we are our regular quiet times of prayer with the Lord. We evaluate what we’re going to wear that day more than we consider the attitude in which we carry that day. We delight more in our meals than in feeding our minds with truth from God’s Word.

We can get by many days without concerning ourselves with what’s below the deck. But there’s no doubt that when the storm hits, everyone will know. Someone will get hurt really bad. But you can avoid that, if you tend to your soul.

Pastor Darrin

April 20, 2016

This past Sunday, we looked at one of the greatest words of instruction on worship in Scripture. When Paul reflected on the incredible love God displays toward sinners like us, he says that in response we should offer our bodies as living sacrifices and that this is your true and proper worship (Romans 12:1). Sacrifices are costly. They are painful. Sacrifices make us think twice. Yet it’s because of those reasons that a sacrifice is so beautiful to our Lord! This kind of worship occurred once during Jesus’ ministry at the home of Simon the Leper.

3 A woman came with an alabaster jar of very expensive perfume, made of pure nard. She broke the jar and poured the perfume on his head. 4 Some of those present were saying indignantly to one another, “Why this waste of perfume? 5 It could have been sold for more than a year’s wages and the money given to the poor.” And they rebuked her 6 “Leave her alone,” said Jesus. “Why are you bothering her? She has done a beautiful thing to me.
Mark 14:3-6

I have to admit that I buy pretty cheap cologne. I’ve upgraded from the Old Spice of my teen years, but still, I don’t think I’ve paid more than $15 for any one bottle. The jar of alabaster perfume this woman had was valued at more than a year’s wages! Chanel Grand Extrait is something my wife has never seen under the Christmas tree. It’s $4,200 per ounce! Twelve ounces of that aromatic liquid would be worth $50,400, a little more than the average annual income for someone in our community. What if that were in your possession? I imagine you would use it very sparingly and only for the most special occasions. Yet this woman didn’t just dab a little on Jesus. She poured it! Like liquid gold it flowed out of the broken jar and on Jesus’ head. Many of the men present thought it was a waste of money. Jesus, however, was moved by her gesture and called it beautiful. Why? Because it was a huge sacrifice.

It reminds me of another story that impressed Jesus. An elderly woman came to give her offering to the Lord and presented two small copper coins. Jesus said it was an extravagant gift because it represented all she had. (Read the full story in Mark 12:41-43).

I don’t know what sacrifice looks like for you. It’s probably not bringing your cologne to church. But maybe it’s pouring out your shame or emptying your pride before the Lord? Maybe it’s offering your time to the Lord in a way you’ve never done before? For some it might look like coming forward in service and kneeling in full surrender to the Lord—laying out your burdens, bitterness or fears? It might be like the widow and giving an extravagant financial gift. I remember when I was a single guy making $8000 a year and I determined to give a one-time gift of $1000 to the Lord for our new church building, a gift that was above my regular tithe. I wanted my gift to be an extravagant one to show the Lord how grateful I was for what He’d done for me and I wanted to be a part of this new project to share His love with others. I had to make a lot sacrifices in what I ate and what I did for entertainment. When the day for commitments came, I was bursting with joy to give to the Lord a gift that truly represented a sacrifice!

Whatever sacrifice would look like for you, know this: Whenever you sacrifice to Jesus, it’s beautiful to Him!

But I Hate My Job pt. 3

by NextGen Pastor Samuel Silveous

This week we’ve talked about how we should respond when we hate what we
have to do for a living. In But I Hate My Job pt 1we talked about how we can always trust
that God is good and has a plan, even if we can’t see it. Then in pt.2
we said that one way to embrace what God is doing is to be like Nehemiah. Who
used the job God gave him to finance the ministry God called him to. Today we’ll
talk about two more ways we can embrace what God is doing in our circumstances.

Step 2: Be Like Joseph

Consider that, not only is God preparing the people and circumstances around you,
but he might also be preparing you. Joseph knew that God had set him apart for
something great because of the dreams he had, but he ends up sold into slavery, and
eventually forgotten in prison. Even so, Joseph did everything to the best of his ability.
Through all of it, God was preparing Joseph to understand the political and economic
landscape of Egypt so that he would be able to save the whole land. Pottifer, the house
where Joseph served, worked in the palace. Joseph gained valuable insight from his
experience there. The prison Joseph was thrown into was full of political prisoners.
Joseph gained additional insight he would need to serve in Pharoh’s house.
Finally, Joseph met the person who would eventually introduce him to Pharoh.
All of these experiences were necessary, not just to get Joseph into place, but to prepare
him for the season ahead. Joseph himself acknowledged this when he said to the
brothers that sold him, “What you intended for evil, God used for good.” In
these seasons, it’s important to be like Joseph and look for opportunities where
God might be trying to grow and change us and remember that his plans for you are
better than your plans for you.

Here are some additional resources that you can use to discover and grow into the
person God is trying to help you become at work:

Step 3: Sacrifice Your Pride

When I went through this season in my life, the key turning point was realizing that I
thought I deserved to be paid to do what I loved. I had this idea that somehow God owed
it to me to give me a job that made me happy. The truth is, jobs, no matter how great,
can’t bring real joy. Only God can do that. Serving as a volunteer at Pike’s
Peak Christian Church and trying to see where God was growing me, brought me to a
point where I could sacrifice that pride. Those two things taught me to trust God not only
with my job, but with my joy.

Work as worship isn’t sucking it up and pushing through. It isn’t sacrificing
begrudgingly for our families. It is giving glory to God for the work he’s allowed us
to do, no matter what that work is, because we trust his heart.

At the beginning of pt. 1 I began a story about a time when I hated my job. Here’s
how it ends:

Several months later, I was sitting in that same smelly basement. But this time it was
different. I had been broken. The gospel had shown me that if Jesus could trust the
Father when God called him to go to the cross, that I could trust him in going to work. It
showed me that I don’t always know what God is doing, but I can trust that his
heart is for me. So that afternoon was different. I wasn’t necessarily happy, but I
was joyful. On that day, my heart cried out, “God, if this is it, if this is all you have
for me, serving as a volunteer and financing my ministry through this job, it’s
enough, because you are enough!”

But I Hate My Job pt. 2

by NextGen Pastor Samuel Silveous

Sometimes it’s tough to see what God is doing. Often times we can feel stuck
in a job that we hate and begin to belive that God doesn’t care. In those times
it’s important to remember that God is good, and he has a plan even if we
can’t see what he’s doing.

In “But I Hate My Job pt. 1” we
looked at God’s proven track record of bringing good things from seemingly
terrible situations. Today, I want to get a little more practical. How can we embrace what
God is doing and cooperate with him rather than combat him?

Step 1: Be Like Nehemiah

In the book of Nehemiah, we find that the book’s main character (and the one
it’s named after) had a job as cupbearer to the king. Now, this job probably gave
him some status and position, but does anybody really grow up saying “I hope
someday I get to be the one who makes sure the king’s drinks aren’t
poisoned?” I doubt it. However, God had positioned him there in order to network
and gain access to resources. So when God gave Nehemiah the vision of rebuilding the
Jerusalem, he had a network available to acquire the resources he would need. The
same king that Nehemiah served, ended up financing the rebuilding of the city of
Jerusalem.

Perhaps your job isn’t great, but it is a paycheck. That’s important.
It’s important to take care of your family. In Ephesians 5:25, Paul writes,
“Husbands, love your wives, as Christ loved the church and gave himself up for
her” (ESV). In Colossians 3:19, he says, “Husbands, love your wives, and
do not be harsh with them” (ESV). When Paul wrote to Timothy about how the
church should operate he said, “But if anyone does not provide for his relatives,
and especially for members of his household, he has denied the faith and is worse than
an unbeliever” (1 Timothy 5:8, ESV).

It’s not ok to not take care of your family because you don’t like your
job. It may be a sacrifice to go to that job everyday, but in sacrificing you are showing
your family your love for them. Consider what Christ sacrificed for us. Is our comfort really
so important that our families should go uncared for? That’s not to say you have
to provide them the best or newest of everything. God isn’t saying provide every
member of your household with an iPhone. He is saying make sure their needs are met.
(You can read more about the idea of sumbission and love in the marriage/family context
in this article from David Platte)

Maybe God has put you in a position to finance your own ministry. Around the world
there are thousands of bi­vocational pastors who work full­time jobs in order to pay their
bills and take care of their families so that they can fund their pastoral work. Even at Pikes
Peak Christian Church we have hundreds of people in bi­vocational ministry. We call
them volunteers. Some of them are small group leaders whose “job” is to
pastor and care for kids, students or adults. Some are servants who help take care of the
building and the grounds so that people feel welcome and expected when they come.
Some help in the Care Center taking care of those in our community with a need. Our
church couldn’t function without them. Truthfully, they are the backbone of
ministry. Serving in this way can often help us see how God is using our paid job, to
finance our ministry job.

Find out how you can serve at Pikes Peak Christian Church

But I Hate My Job pt. 1

by NextGen Pastor Samuel Silveous

It wasn’t all that long ago. I can still almost smell the slightly musty odor of
that basement room in a no­name building on Peterson Air Force Base in Colorado
Springs. I remember watching the rest of the office seeming to move in fast forward
around me as I sat at the conference table trying to work on the requirements for the next
contract while thinking, “What am I doing here? I hate this.”

I had already felt the call into ministry. I had finished the degree program I would need
to enter into paid ministry. Yet, I was still working in a job that I could barely pull myself
out of bed for each morning. I didn’t know it at the time, but that season would
end up being one of the most critical periods in my life. A time that God had prepared for
me in order to form in me the faith I would need to be in paid ministry.

If you’ve ever been in a similar season, you know that hope can be hard to
hold on to, and the moments of joy (at least on the job) are few and far between. So how
do we worship through our work in those seasons? Not “are we supposed to?
”, we know the answer to that. What most of us really need is help with the actual
how.

I think the most important principle to remember in these seasons, is that God is
good, and he has a plan, even if we can’t see what he’s doing.
Throughout scripture we see God taking things that seem terrible and turning them into
something wonderful. He promises to do this for the prophet Jeremiah when he says
“I know the plans I have for you…” “plans to prosper you
and not to harm you, plans to gvie you hope and a future” (Jeremiah 29:11, NIV).
We see it in Abraham and the promise to make him a great nation even though
he’s old and without a son. He does it again for Joseph, who can’t seem
to catch a break until one day, we realize all the hardhsip has been leading to a position
in government where he will save the entire nation and the surrounding nations.

But nowhere is it more evident than in Jesus. God’s only son, sent to die a
horrific death. It seemed that all hope was lost, that God had been defeated. The Messiah
was dead. But we find that God had a bigger, better plan at work. In Christ’s
death we recieve life. Because he died in our place, we no longer have to fear death.

Over and over, God turns the darkest of situations into amazing comeback stories.
This plays out differently for each of us, and it would be impossible to address every
situation specifically. But when we remember that God is good, and he has a plan even if
we can’ see what he’s doing, we set ourselves up to cooperate with God
rather than work against him.

For today, let’s focus on remembering that God is good, and he has a plan,
even if we can’t see what he’s doing. I know that doesn’t seem
extreemly helpful. But that baseline is critical to allowing God to work in these seasons.
Over the next few days we’ll give some more practical advice on embracing the
season God has you in, but for today, just remember. God is good, he has a plan even if
we can’t see what he’s doing.

 

Here is the site that Darrin mentioned in his sermon:
http://www.familylife.com/articles/topics/marriage/staying-married/gods-plan-for-marriage/how-should-we-define-marriage-today

Billy Ramsdell
April 7

“As for me and my house, we will serve the Lord” (Joshua 24:15)

Doesn’t that look great on a wall hanging?? But…what does it mean, really??

At Pikes Peak Christian Church we seek to bring attention to what real WORSHIP looks like. We will spend the month of April on a series called “REIMAGINE WORSHIP”.
www.reimagineworship.com

We will begin by learning more about “WORSHIP IN THE HOME”. What does this mean? Am I doing it right? Do my kids get it? I take my kids to church on Sunday, isn’t that good enough? We take communion and try not to be a bad person, isn’t that good enough?

WORSHIP as a word and concept was introduced into the human conversation in a very unexpected way. We pray to learn from this and to apply it in our everyday life and home. To bring WORSHIP IN THE HOME we must understand where it began and why.

Genesis 22 tells us a story of Abraham, we call him Father Abraham, because he was an early Faith Father to the people of God and eventually, much of the population of the world. Before then, Abraham had only a promise from God, that he would be made a Father to many nations. He had no son to carry his name, he grieved it and was a little confused. Then, God game him several kids, one of which was his most prized son, Isaac.

In the story, God calls Abraham to go to Mt. Moriah to offer a sacrifice. This was one Old Testament element of WORSHIP, even though they didn’t use the word, exactly, until this one incident. Abraham makes things ready to head up the mountain, in obedience the God. The strangest part of the story was the object of sacrifice, it was his son, Isaac.

QUESTION: Would God really give Abraham the gift of life, a son to carry on his legacy, his beloved and cherished child, only to ask him to give him back in an offering? This is hard for us to relate to today, but lets try to learn from the moment Abraham began using the word “WORSHIP”. The Word of God says, “Sometime later, God tested Abraham. He said to him, ‘Abraham’! ‘Here I am’, he replied. Then God said, ‘Take your son, your only son, whom you love – Isaac – and go to the region of Moriah. Sacrifice him there as a burnt offering on a mountain I will show you.’ Early the next morning Abraham got up and loaded his donkey. He took with him two of his servants and his son Isaac. When he had cut enough wood for the burnt offering, he set out for the place God had told him about. On the third day Abraham looked up and saw the place in the distance. He said to his servants, ‘stay here with the donkey while I and the boy go over there. We will WORSHIP and then we will come back to you’ (Genesis 22:1-5)

The foundational point of this message to us, regarding a HOME OF WORSHIP is this….

  •  WORSHIP began in the context of the home & family. Not in a temple, tabernacle, church or cathedral. God introduced this word in the context of a father and son, living in obedience to God and doing it together. This is evidence that God placed the idea of WORSHIP first, in the home and the family.
  •  WORSHIP in your home begins with you. You reproduce who you are, not who you want to be, or who you want others to be. So, lead your family in the direction you want them to go by being willing to go first. Be who you want others to become!!!
  •  WORSHIP is not part of our life, it is our life. We don’t exist to be comfortable, to pay bills, to go bowling, to watch sports or catch all the great deals at the market. Those things are part of life, but we are first and foremost a living, breathing sacrifice of WORSHIP to God. It’s not part of our life….IT IS OUR LIFE.
  •  WORSHIP in the Home is developed as we engineer environments that either promote or interfere with the presence of God in our home. We must consider the focus and direction of our home. We must consider the atmosphere and environment. Does worship as a lifestyle grow from the environments we build? We are not talking about the act of going to church or being a good person. We believe those are good things to do, but we must shift to a lifestyle of worship, environments where worship is normal and that requires us to develop these environments on purpose.
    • Limit – Limit the stream of secular media into your mind, heart, ears and home. The voices coming from the world are so loud and constant. We cannot expect our family to hear God effectively when the draw of the world rings in their ears all the time. Turn it off and turn it down. Make space for you and your family to hear the voice of God.
    •  Invest – Invest into the truth of God and experiences that get you and your family into the presence of God. We crave what we eat, so make it possible for you and your family to eat and drink of the work and presence of God often. Go to conferences, buy great Christian music and videos, read books about the truth of God or those who live it out. Learn together, grow together and do more than just look for the next opportunity to be entertained. Look for opportunities to invest into yourselves.
    •  Practice – As you invest, you will be practicing the presence of God together. Serve together, learn together, worship together, go to church, concerts, bible studies or whatever helps your family grow in the truth. In our town we go to the Desperation Conference, The Thorn, the Belong Conference for women, movies that bring God into the picture like War Room or Woodlawn. We are not saying “be super Christian” about everything you do. We are saying flex the muscles of service, prayer, worship, learning and growing, more than you flex the muscles of entertainment, distraction and discouragement, isolation and disconnection.
  •  RESOURCES & SUGGESTIONS……….These are not silver bullets, just suggestions about how to invest in areas that may help you develop environments where the presence of God. You should be able to search these on the internet and find them easily.
    • www.reimagineworship.com
    • www.Yes2God.org/NextGen/Engage
    • Family Christian Store or Mardel (books & music)
    • Parent Que (smart phone app – aligns with our children’s ministry curriculum)
    • RightNow Media (netflix type site for 1000s of hours of Christian content)
    • Family Worship Weekends (family church experience at PPCC)
    • Vacation Bible School (VBS for kids and parents too this year)
    • Adventures In Odyssey (Radio, Internet, Club & Ice Cream Shop)
    • Desperation Conference (Student Conf. here in Colorado Springs)
    • Dare2Share Conference (Student Conf. in Denver)
    • Heaven Fest (Christian Concert Festival in Denver)
    • Winter Jam (Christian Concern here in Colorado Springs)
    • Heart of a Woman (Ladies Conference in Colorado Springs)
    • Glen Eyrie Conf. Center (Women’s, Men’s, Couples events)
    • Camp Eagle Lake (Student Camps)
    • Weekly Youth Group, Small Groups, Children’s Church
    • Family Mission Trips
    • Service Projects in the City
    • Special Events at Church
    • Much more available…..

Pastor Darrin Ronde

April 1, 2016

A friend of mine shared with me this week that something I said in a sermon a couple weeks ago has bothered his soul. I had stated an observation in my message March 13th (Cross Encounter: Simon of Cyrene) that when I talk to people in church, people that have a relationship with Christ, I find that they fall into one of three groups:

First, there are those who say Jesus is important. These are very sincere people who have come to believe that their lives are better with Jesus than without Him. They’ve experienced the dissatisfaction of Jesus being a casual part of their life and have found that their lives are better when Jesus is treated as someone important.

A second group of people are those who say Jesus is first. Picture the athlete in the post-game interview who mentions the name Jesus and points his index finger upward to heaven. These are people who make Jesus a priority. They give Him the first hours of their week as they come to worship with other believers. They wake up in the morning and give their first thoughts to God. They give the first 10% of what God has given them to help build His kingdom. They pray first before making critical decisions. Of their many relationships, they are unashamed to say Jesus is at the top of their list.

I used to think this was the pinnacle of spiritual growth, until I met people that were radical in their commitment to Jesus. This third category of people are those who say Jesus is everything. Jesus is important and He’s first, but He’s even more than that. Picture a wheel with Jesus as the hub. Everything about their lives is directed by their relationship with Jesus—including their attitude, language, marriage, family, finances, career, entertainment—everything! Jesus is like oxygen or water. They are sold out believers who can’t imagine living a day without Him. I think this is what the Apostle Paul was getting at when he wrote these words:

I have been crucified with Christ and I no longer live, but Christ lives in me. The life I now live in the body, I live by faith in the Son of God, who loved me and gave himself for me.
Galatians 2:20

Jesus wasn’t just a PART of his life; Jesus WAS his life! His body became an instrument that Christ could use for His purposes. I want a faith like that. Jesus, be my everything!

t > i < ,

Pastor Darrin